EyeMyth Day 4: Stepping into tomorrow
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Day 4 at EyeMyth began with the participants at the augmented reality workshop building visual prototypes and testing them with their mentors. Mark Arkin, Director at Cross Labs in the UK said "For the past few days, we have had six teams learning what works in VR storytelling, how to develop in Unity and the principles of photogrammetry, then forming cross-disciplinary teams to come up with new concepts for Indian VR experiences. On day 4 of the workshop, each team completed a pitch proposal and working prototype that can be viewed in a VR headset."

The six projects that are now nearing completion cover a wide variety of subjects. Vikram and Betaal VR reinterprets the much-loved ancient fables for a contemporary millennial audience. Beyond Books is a call-to-action for teachers to inspire students rather than focusing on rote learning. Resistance is Futile sensitises young Indians to the very real problem of antibiotic over-prescription leading to drug-resistant viruses that could wipe out an entire generation of young Indians unless we change our habits. Breathe... While You Still Can traces the air pollutants that are choking Indian towns and cities, leading to respiratory conditions and diseased organs, to the coal-fired power plants that cause them. Dekho uses WebVR to unite geo-dislocated families, allowing elderly or disabled people to virtually join other family members as they travel on holiday or on pilgrimage. Bambaiyer VR preserves the cultural heritage of the diverse communities that have contributed to Mumbai's unique cultural mix, allowing us to navigate the city and enter buildings and meet the Parsis, Muslims, British and Kolis who have each left their mark on this extraordinary city. These projects are now ready for a pitch to potential funders who will take it to completion and the projects will be showcased at a future EyeMyth event before travelling the world.

All photos courtesy of Ali Bharmal / Red Bull Content Pool

Later at the Red Bull Music Academy, things kicked off with a discussion between Nick Dwyer and Soichi Terada, a Japanese music composer known for his work on the PlayStation exclusive Ape Escape series. He also spoke to the audience about his career and shared insights on video games music, the rise of house music in Japan and his inspiration. He gave the audience an insight into the world of video game music and a window to the explosion of dance culture in Tokyo from the late 80s through the 1990s. The Sessions also included a screening of episodes 1, 2 and 4 of Diggin' in the Carts - a pioneering documentary series exploring how Japanese video game music became a global, cultural phenomenon.

All photos courtesy of Ali Bharmal / Red Bull Content Pool

Terada is mostly recognised for his iconic contribution to Japanese video game music, although thanks to the reissuing of his classic works courtesy of acclaimed Dutch label Rush Hour, a whole new global audience is falling in love with his now decades old productions.

All photos courtesy of Ali Bharmal / Red Bull Content Pool

Through the 80s and 90s, Terada - along with a handful of other Japanese producers like Shinichiro Yokota - cooked up his own melodically rich slant on house music. Ranging in style from personable and fun to more moody and soulful, Terada has a broad sound palette that is full of humour and real character.