The highest rave in history: This DJ performed a set on Everest base camp
Pop Culture
When you think about 'the highest party in Earth', your brain might concoct something which involves powerful hallucinations and groovy vibes. But what if we take it a little too literally and say it?

Three-time Grammy nominated British DJ Paul Oakenfold has played a DJ set at Mount Everest's base camp on Monday. Performing at 5,380 metres above sea level, it was literally the highest party in the world.

Oakenfold is marking the 30th anniversary of his famed trip to Ibiza, which sparked the second Summer of Love, often termed as one of the biggest revolution in British youth culture since the original Summer of Love in California in 1967.

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When you think about ‘the highest party in Earth’, your brain might concoct something which involves powerful hallucinations and groovy vibes. But what if we take it a little too literally and say it?

The DJ, who had no prior trekking experience, walked for ten days to the base camp with yaks and porters carrying the audio equipment required for the event. Oakenfold trained for four months in between hectic late night gigs to prepare for the party up in the Himalayas.

"I'm not going to pretend it was easy to get here ... but it has been a wonderful trek. If you could see the view I'm looking at, it is very inspiring," he said while speaking to AFP. Surely, the world's highest party will offer a whole different kind of high as compared to his usual shows which draws thousands of young revellers.

However, it would be difficult to jump, groove and dance to his music so high up. "The audience will probably be sitting mostly. The air is so thin here, you will run out of breath quite quickly," Ranzen Jha, a Nepali DJ accompanying the DJ told AFP.

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When you think about ‘the highest party in Earth’, your brain might concoct something which involves powerful hallucinations and groovy vibes. But what if we take it a little too literally and say it?

The gig is part of Oakenfold's SoundTrek series which aims to take electronic music to some of the world's remotest and challenging locations with the intention of raising awareness about environmental degradation and promoting local cultures and charities.

The series also aims to raise funds through the gigs to help rehabilitate the survivors of Nepal's devastating earthquake in 2015 which killed nearly 9,000 people and left thousands homeless.


The sound of the future: Portable music creation tools that scored big at NAMM 2017

When you think about ‘the highest party in Earth’, your brain might concoct something which involves powerful hallucinations and groovy vibes. But what if we take it a little too literally and say it?

Indie Art Week Carnival: Soul-stirring indie music with a dash of comedy

When you think about ‘the highest party in Earth’, your brain might concoct something which involves powerful hallucinations and groovy vibes. But what if we take it a little too literally and say it?